Activated Charcoal in the Treatment of Arthritis

Activated Charcoal in the Treatment of Arthritis

Good morning Dr. Kaye

You wrote asking if we are aware of charcoal being used for arthritis. Was there a particular arthritis you were thinking of?

We have several experiences of charcoal working for Gouty arthritis of the feet - taken orally in conjunction with a warm footbath with charcoal powder stirred in. Some also find relief from Uveitis with warm charcoal poultices over the eyes.

We do have a letter from one doctor who applies charcoal poultices (http://www.buyactivatedcharcoal.com/poultice ) for the pain and inflammation of several conditions. He confesses he does not understand why it would work with deep tissue pain but that it does.

"Pain (http://www.buyactivatedcharcoal.com/pain )
When I interviewed Dr. Wynn over the phone, I asked him what he sees charcoal used for most often. “Here at Uchee Pines we use it for many different problems. However, I would say mostly for pain, inflammation and pain of joints, or around the trunk area for bowel complaints. It is most often applied overnight with a flaxseed poultice. The majority of people find relief from whatever pain they are experiencing. But I can’t explain how it works. I understand how it might work internally by adsorbing toxins, but exactly how it can relieve deep tissue pain or draw out toxins when used externally is still a mystery to me. I know flaxseed has its own anti-inflammatory properties, but that still doesn’t explain such dramatic results.”
Pain is a condition all of its own, and when other common forms of treatment fail to bring relief, charcoal can be tried without any worry of doing harm. Mention has already been made of treating the pain of gout (one form of arthritis), but a trial of charcoal poultices should also be made for the pain associated with sore throat, earache, toothache, irritated eyes, sprains, inflammations, and bruises. Relief within the half hour is not unusual. The poultice may be left on for several hours or overnight.
Any area that is red, painful, swollen, and hot often responds to charcoal. The pain produced by cancer, whether in the bone, the abdomen or elsewhere, may often be controlled with a charcoal poultice. If an injury is better suited to a charcoal bath, mix half a cup of charcoal into two gallons of warm water and soak for thirty to sixty minutes.

Tic doloreaux is a very painful habit spasm of the face. But in one case, when we placed a poultice over the affected area of one sufferer, the pain was relieved and the woman had her first full night’s sleep in a long time." (CharcoalRemedies.com page 129)

We have also had some customers that say they get relief from arthritic pain with the Greenyarn Products (knee and elbow guards, and socks)


We do not understand the ability of charcoal to capture and release far infrared rays, but apparently it does promote circulation. Most sense the increased warmth of a particular area when these products are worn.

We believe a trial application of warm charcoal poultices for a week should be tried over the affected areas. If the charcoal is going to work there will probably be a measure of relief from the outset.

I hope this helps. We have the assurance that if it does not work, at least it will do no harm.

Of course, in conjunction with any remedy, one would want to isolate any underlying factors that may be triggering or aggravating the arthritis.

If you have other questions or if we can be of more help please do contact us again.

Sincerely
Editor